History Of University Of Southern California

048 university of southern CaliforniaUniversity of Southern California commonly known as SC or USC is a private, nonsectarian, not for profit Research University that is founded way back in the 1880. It has its main campus in Los Angeles, California. USC is also the oldest private research university in California. In the past years, UCS has leveraged its location in Los Angeles in order to establish relationships with cultural and research institution in Asia and the Pacific Rim. The university has the largest number of international students compared to other universities in the United States. Last 2011, USC has named as one of the Top 10 Dream Colleges in the United States.

University of Southern California was founded through the efforts of Judge Robert M. Widney who helped to secure funds and donations from several people in the early history of Los Angeles. The people who funded the establishment of the university includes an Irish Catholic a former governor named John Gately Downey, Ozro Childs a protestant nurseryman and Isaias Hellman a German Jewish banker. These three people donated the 308 lots of land to establish the campus and they also provided money for the construction of the first buildings. The university was originally operated with the affiliation of Methodist church wherein they mandated that no student shall be denied of admission because of race. It was in the year 1952 that the university severed formal ties that they are no longer affiliated with any church.

In the year 1880, University of Southern California opened with a $15.00 tuition per term. Students are not allowed to leave town without the knowledge and consent of the university president. During its first year, USC has 10 faculty and 53 students. The first graduating class in the year 1884, there are only three students that are composed of two males and a female named Minnie c. Miltimore, the class valedictorian.

USC has this trademark colors which are the cardinal and gold. These colors were approved by USC’s third president George White in the year 1896. USC’s students and athletes are called Fighting Methodists or Wesleyans until the year 1912. However neither of the two names where approved, not after the university won in the track and field meets with Stanford University. After winning the contest a sports writer Owen Bird reported that USC athletes “fought on like Trojans”. It was then that George Bovard, the University president during that time, approved the name Trojans to address the students of the University of Southern California.